5 Free Definitely have-to-do’s in Hermanus

Walk the Cliff Path

Walk the cliff path from Grotto Beach to the new harbour (or vice versa). Pack a day pack and stop to have something to eat along the way. The walk can take anything from four to six hours, depending on your pace, how many times you stop, etc. Don’t be in a hurry. Take a swim along the way and stop to smell the fynbos. Reward yourself with a liquid refreshment at Dutchies Restaurant at the end at Grotto beach. This is a nice family activity. There are very few steps along the way, so it is possible to do with a child in a stroller if there are a pair of hands on deck to help carry it up and down. Find out more about the cliff path here: https://www.fernkloof.org.za/index.php/fernkloof-nature-reserve/hermanus-cliff-path.

Walking in Fernkloof

There are three dams in Fernkloof. The first is easy enough to reach for healthy persons. There are steps with uphills and downhills involved, but nothing serious. It is an activity that can be done with young children. Small children must be always accompanied by a parent. This route is not stroller friendly, so keep that in mind. To reach the second and third dams is much more difficult and is definitely not suitable for children younger than 12. You also need to know the route to these two dams, because the footpath is not always visible everywhere. Rather go in groups than alone for your safety.

Fernkloof also offers hiking and cycling trails which start from the entrance at the foot of the mountain. Find out more here: https://www.fernkloof.org.za/.

Walking on Grotto Beach

The beach from Grotto Beach stretches for kilo’s along Walker Bay and one can walk all the way to De Kelders (about 20km) and even further. With a day pack on the back, good shoes and food and water, this is a great walk if you want to have a hike along the ocean. If you do not want to go that far, do shorter walks (like an hour out and an hour back). Take a dip in the sea when it gets too hot. It is also safer to go in a group.

Cycling on the beach is another alternative if you want a bit more adventure and have your own fat bike. (Bikes are for hire, but this is a free activities article.)

Watch the Sunset on the Mountain Top

Sunsets are just fabulous from the viewing points on the mountain. When driving out of town towards Cape Town, turn right on the Rotary Way (https://www.hermanus.co.za/rotary-way) and follow the road to the viewing point. Have a nice non-alcoholic sundowner up there while watching the sun vanish behind the water horizon. (Again, go in a small group or as family. Keep car doors shut and no valuables openly visible in your vehicle.)

Picnicking on the Beach

With the long never-ending summer days, a picnic on the beach is a wonderful end to a magnificent day in the sun. Take along a picnic basket, an umbrella if needed, a picnic blanket and welcome the evening while watching the sun set with the people you love.

!Remember!

  • Wear sunblock
  • Be alert towards you and your family’s safety. If possible, do these activities in groups or as a whole family.
  • Respect all animals on your adventures and do not feed them.
  • Put emergency numbers in your cell phone contact list. Click here to find the list of numbers: https://fieliesdekock.com/2020/12/16/your-guide-to-a-safe-hermanus-holiday/.
  • Please leave only your shoe or wheel prints behind. For everything else, use the bins provided.

For more safety tips, click here: https://fieliesdekock.com/2020/12/16/your-guide-to-a-safe-hermanus-holiday/

For more to do in and around Hermanus, read here: https://fieliesdekock.com/2020/10/09/hermanus_is_awaiting_you/

Enjoy your stay!

© 2020 Fielies De Kock

HERMANUS UNLIMITED is a travel writing blog showcasing Hermanus and surrounding areas through photos and articles. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

5 Reasons why you Absolutely should Visit Hermanus

  1. It is nestled in the heart of the Overberg region

The Overberg region includes Hermanus, Gansbaai, Kleinmond, Betty’s Bay, Stanford, Greyton and many more picturesque towns which can be visited during short day trips while on holiday in Hermanus. Visit SA Places at https://www.places.co.za/html/towns_in_the_overberg.html to read more about these beauties waiting for you to visit.

2              Hemel-en-Aarde Valley Wines

Hermanus has got its own wine route in the Hemel-en-Aarde Valley (translation: Heaven and Earth Valley). Click here to plan your wineries visits – https://www.decanter.com/wine-travel/south-africa/hemel-en-aarde-wineries-to-visit-378182/ or make use of the wine hopper from Market Square in Hermanus. Learn more here: https://www.hermanuswinehoppers.co.za/. This is a fun and safe way to visit farms without having to drive. It is ideal for families and small groups.

3              The Fynbos

Fynbos is the generic name for a great variety of fine-leafed plants, with more than 9 000 of the 30 000 species being indigenous and unique only to the Western Cape region of South Africa. Fynbos doesn’t grow naturally anywhere else in the world. Learn more about fynbos here: http://www.percytours.com/fynbos-plants-cape-floral-kingdom.html#.X75UaGgzbDc. A long or short hike in Fernkloof and on the cliff path in Hermanus showcases thousands of species. The Harold Porter Botanical Garden in Betty’s Bay (https://www.sanbi.org/gardens/harold-porter/) is just a stone’s throw away and offers a great morning or afternoon outing for the whole family.  

4              Everything the Village has to Offer

Hermanus has some of the best restaurants in South Africa (and we locals believe in the world). The promenade is lined with restaurants with magnificent ocean views, but there are jewels to be found in the heart of the village, offering fantastic food. Walk around to find them or look them up on the Internet. In the December holiday period, booking is essential.

Hiking on the cliff path, in the mountain in Fernkloof, cycling, kayaking and canoeing on good weather days are just a few outdoors things to do. Hermanus Sportsclub (http://www.hermanussport.co.za/) offers tennis and squash and has a restaurant too.

Hermanus has 20 art galleries and a display of outdoor art at Gearing’s Point as part of FynArts Hermanus (https://www.hermanusfynarts.co.za/).

5              The Beaches

Grotto Beach is Hermanus’ Blue Flag pride with loads of space to swim, surf, sit in the sun or having long walks. The estuary mouth is currently open, which offers canoeing, kitesurfing and swimming opportunities.

Voëlklip, Kammabaai (ideal for families with small children) and Langbaai are more intimate beaches and ideal to enjoy a sunset picnic.

Neighbouring beaches include Onrus, Sandbaai and Hawston.

And there you have it – just a few reasons why Hermanus is such an irresistible place to keep coming back to. Again and again. And again. And again. And…

Read here for more about Hermanus and things to do: https://fieliesdekock.com/2020/10/09/hermanus_is_awaiting_you/

Make sure not to let down your guard while on holiday, so also read my blog entry on how to stay safe in Hermanus at https://fieliesdekock.com/2020/12/16/your-guide-to-a-safe-hermanus-holiday/.

PHOTOS: Fielies de Kock

© 2020 Fielies De Kock

HERMANUS UNLIMITED is a travel writing blog showcasing Hermanus and surrounding areas through photos and articles. Ads for businesses may be added at a later stage.

Hermanus’ Celebrities of the Sea

Hermanus is one of the twelve best whale watching destinations in the world according to the World Wildlife Fund (although we believe it is the Whale Capital of the World). This makes the village a favourite holiday destination for both local and overseas visitors. As the whale migration season is coming to an end, tourism in Hermanus is just starting to pick up again during the current level of lockdown due to the Covid-19 pandemic and with the borders slowly opening, tourists from abroad will hopefully soon start streaming to our shores again.

Walker Bay is famous for being the breeding grounds for the Southern Right Whales, travelling all the way from their feeding grounds around Antarctica. According to marine environmentalist, Noel Ashton, the South African coastline provides an ideal playground for over half of the world’s species of whales and dolphins due to the two oceanic system supporting so many different life forms.

Although it was believed that the whales feed in the Northern hemisphere waters and only come here for birthing and (a process called feast and famine), in recent years Humpback whales had been seen feeding off Cape Columbine, near Paternoster in early summer, where food is in abundance. Read about and look at amazing aerial pictures of the 2019 migration of humpbacks at https://www.sapeople.com/2019/11/30/unbelievable-sighting-of-hundreds-of-whales-off-south-african-coast-photos-by-jean-tresfon/.

Species of Whales Visiting Walker Bay

Other than the Southern Right Whale, Humpbacks and Bryde’s Whales are also found visiting Walker Bay. The bay has a few residential whales which are seen infrequently right through the year.

Hermanus’ Whale Season

The best time to come to Hermanus to see whales is between June and November, with September being the ideal time. The annual Whale Festival is normally held on the last weekend of September. Other related festivals around the time is the Kalfiefees (translation: calve’s feast) in Onrus and the Flower Show (normally the weekend before the Whale Festival).

How to Watch our Celebs

Hermanus has whale watching boats which take visitors to experience the whales up close and personal. For visitors on a tighter budget or for those preferring not going on boats, the good news is that they are visible from the promenade, with Gearing’s Point, the Old Harbour (in the CBD-area) and Siever’s Punt, popular places to watch from. Hermanus’ own whale crier could be found on busy days, blowing on his kelp horn when a whale is observed.

What to pack when visiting Hermanus to do Whale Watching

Although springs shows its warmth in the rest of South Africa, Hermanus can see some of the coldest days during September and October, with rainy and windy days sandwiched in between beautiful wind-still days. So, if you plan to visit, please remember to:

  • Make sure to pack some warm clothes for cold weather and layer when getting clothed in the morning.
  • With the cool sea breeze almost a constant, carry a jacket and beanie when going out.
  • Bringing good binoculars will ensure a great viewing experience.
  • Although cell phone cameras are incredibly good these days, bring your DSLR or a good smaller camera. If going on a boat, you will be able to take close by photos of whales, but from the shore you will need a camera with a good zoom ability.
  • Good walking shoes is a must for going ‘whale hunting’ from spot to spot to get good pictures.

Interesting Whale Facts

  • The Southern Right is one of three species classified as ‘baleen’ whale. They are black with brownish bonnets, with parasite crustaceans attaching themselves to the whale’s body.
  • Whales normally give birth to only one calf, although they may carry up to seven foetuses.
  • The gestation period is about 12 months.
  • Calves are born between June and September in the bay, making a visit to Hermanus and surroundings during this time quite rewarding.
  • Mother and calf stay close together in Walker Bay until the calves are strong enough to make the journey back to the North.
  • Calves are nursed for about six months.
  • They usually return to the same place to give birth, although there are exceptions.
  • Instead of teeth, they have hornlike plates consisting of bone.
  • It is believed that whales have a three-year cycle of pregnancy, providing them with enough time between calving to feed and recuperate sufficiently.
  • According to the University of Pretoria Mammal Research Institute’s Whale Unit, there were between 70 000 and 80 000 whales in the 1700’s. From then on, their numbers declined so much that they were put under international protection. It is estimated that there are around 12 000 Southern Rights now, of a third of which roam through South African waters annually.

Reading through books about Hermanus, many a story is penned about people’s experiences with whales – mostly death-defying recordings of men in fishing boats, big and small. Hermanus’ most famous dame though didn’t endanger anyone’s life as far as I have read, but she chose her favourite spot in Walker Bay and kept coming back here. Wendy, as she was called by locals, loved a spot near a cove close to town nearby Hermanus Pieters’ fountain. The cottage standing there on the rocks by itself was thus fittingly called Wendy’s Cottage. It is still standing, being awarded heritage status. Wendy stopped coming there in the early 1940’s and another whale came to inhabit her spot. Of course, she was named after her popular predecessor. Maybe she was even Wendy’s offspring…

Other Residents to Lookout for when the Whales are Shy During your Whale Watching Holiday

If you miss the superstars during ‘whale season’ or if you are here at the right time but they seem to be shy and don’t show themselves, keep an eye out for other stars on our marine stage.

  • Dolphins are frequently passing through the bay swimming and diving, with their shimmering bodies and bold moves making it look as if they are flying in and out of the water. They are sometimes accompanying penguins.
  • Close to Hermanus are two sanctuaries for African penguins – at Kleinbaai, (near Gansbaai towards L’Agullas), and the other at Betty’s Bay (to the other side towards Cape Town). A visit to these sanctuaries is a great family activity and a wonderful daytrip to also explore other sights in those areas.
  • In the absence of the whales, the cute dassies (rock hyrax) entertain locals and tourists with their laziness on the one hand, and their swiftness and craftiness when it comes to acquiring food throughout the year.
  • Cape Fur Seal colonies are also to be found in Walker Bay and on a walk of the cliff paths they can be seen hunting and playing in the water near to the rocks. The New Harbour, Gearing’s Point and Kwaaiwater are places to be on the lookout for these wonderful creatures.
  • Sharks are protected in the area and shark cage diving is an option for the ‘dare-devil’ visitor. Kleinbaai, near Gansbaai, is the basis of cage diving in the area.
  • Birdlife is of course aplenty in the Overberg area. Use your whale watching binoculars to spot the many species found along the coast and keep the camera ready to capture spectacular pictures of seagulls and other birds in flight.

To find more things to do in Hermanus, read my previous blog entry at https://fieliesdekock.com/2020/10/09/hermanus_is_awaiting_you/

Sources to check out for much more interesting facts and lots more information about whales:

Book: Hermanus Whales, Wines, Fynbos, Art – by Beth Hunt (and photographs by Johann and Kobus Kruger)

Book: Whale Capital Chronicles 1, S. J. Du Toit

Read about Hermanus’ history on Robin Lee’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002247851042

Other links:

http:www.old-harbour-museum.co.za

http://www.whaletrail.co.za/southern-right-whale.html

https://xplorio.com/xplorio-headquarters/en/blog/41717/the-southern-right-whales-journey-to-walker-bay/

© 2020 Fielies De Kock

HERMANUS UNLIMITED is a travel writing blog showcasing Hermanus and surrounding areas through photos and articles. Ads for businesses may be added at a later stage.

Read full articles at http://www.fieliesdekock.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Hermanus-Unlimited-118490463355941

Instagram: @HERMANUS_UNLIMITED

Email: hermanusunlimited@gmail.com

Partnering with House Watchers Hermanus